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LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Allis-Chalmers WD 45, a 1950s Farm Tractor
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Allis-Chalmers WD 45, a 1950s Farm Tractor
YODA’S SPOILER ALERT: “SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT, THIS IS!"
About this creation
With this little project I switched from modeling old aircraft to an old farm tractor. I remember as a pre-teen driving my grandfather’s Allis-Chalmers WD 45 around the family farm, with my watchful father riding beside me (thanks, Dad, you’re so cool).

The popular farm equipment brands could be identified by their color. John Deere was (and still is) green, Farm-All and International Harvester were red, Ford was blue, and Allis-Chalmers equipment was a shiny “Persian Orange” – well, at least as the tractors rolled off the assembly line, before becoming mud-splattered. The photographs here (credit TractorData.com) show what the freshly produced WD 45 model looked like in the “tricycle wheel” version. Over the years Allis-Chalmers sold an estimated 150,000 farm tractors in many models. Quite a few of them are still around. One way you buy this tractor as a model today is as a diecast metal toy made by Ertl of Dyersville, Iowa.

My 1:17 scale model has 155 elements, but half of the elements needed to build this model as pictured are not available from TLG in the color orange. The shallow tread pattern of the rear tires looks a bit wimpy compared to the deep treads on the real tractor tires. (TLG part 23798 has a true tractor tread but it mismatches the scale of this model.) By contrast the front tires of my model have decent grooves for their treads, which (ironically) on the real tractor are smooth by comparison. My limited tire choices compromised fidelity in overall appearance.




The gray TLG axles (pointing forwards and rearwards) deserve comment. On the real tractor these rods provided torque from the engine in order to run the mechanicals that might be attached. Implements attached to the front of the tractor (such as a corn harvester) could be run from the power pick-up above the front wheels. Separate clutches for the drive train and power pick-ups enabled the implements to keep working even when the tractor wasn’t moving, and vice versa.




Tractors towed a variety farm implements – for example, the manure-spreader. After connecting it to the tractor’s towing latch and to the rear power pick-up bar, the manure-spreader would hurl globs of cow-pies over the fields as fertilizer. I have included a picture below of Allis-Chalmer’s version which shows its power-driven augur and rotating spikes that hurled bovine excrement across many a fair farmland. For fun, feel free to make a joke below in the comments about manure-spreaders.

Thanks for visiting!



Comments

 I made it 
  June 10, 2018
Quoting Gabor Pauler If I were a farmer I was concerned about 3 separate tracks of the machine instead of 2 ones by conventional tractors: it can destroy more plants moving on the field, or you can plant only narrower rows. But I gues that the turning radius of it with tifferetial braking was unbeatable compared to conventional tractors.
Thanks, Dr. Pauler. While doing my online research, I was surprised to see a function on this tractor my family never showed me. The distance separating the rear wheels is variable. While the tractor is stationary, the rear wheels can spin on their hubs to achieve a wider stance, which can address the issue you raise about wheels running over the plantings. There’s a video clip of it at 6:10 here at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYH3q9nJ-fc. (The YouTube video is called “1950’s Allis-Chalmers promotional film for WD-45 tractors.”). It would be quite a challenge to replicate that function in Lego! This model of tractor also had a version with front wheels separated at the same distance as the rear. The promotional film highlights a number of engineering design features meant for the convenience of farmers.
 I like it 
  June 10, 2018
If I were a farmer I was concerned about 3 separate tracks of the machine instead of 2 ones by conventional tractors: it can destroy more plants moving on the field, or you can plant only narrower rows. But I gues that the turning radius of it with tifferetial braking was unbeatable compared to conventional tractors.
 
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The background images used on this page are © Todd Lehman,
available at http://www.lugnet.com/fibblesnork/lego/backgrounds/


LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Allis-Chalmers WD 45, a 1950s Farm Tractor


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