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Lockheed AC-130 Gunship
Here is my interpretation of the AC-130 gunship, commonly known as the Spectre. Based upon my C-130 Hercules airframe, it is built to minfig scale and has many new features and design elements. The AC-130 has a long and interesting career so what follows is my attempt to compile a visual history in LDD of its evolution. I’ve gone a little further in my usual research, so, sit back with a cup of tea or a dram of your favourite single malt and enjoy Kurt’s MOCs’ (lengthy) presentation of this incredible gunship. As always, leave a comment if you wish. Check out my flickr page for larger pictures here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/118702264@N05/. The LDD model of the C-130J variant is available on my Etsy site: www.etsy.com/ca/shop/KurtsMOCs.
About this creation

The Lockheed AC-130 gunship is a heavily armed, long-endurance ground-attack variant of the C-130 Hercules transport. It carries a wide array of anti-ground oriented weapons that are integrated with sophisticated sensors, navigation, and fire-control systems. Unlike other military fixed-wing aircraft, the AC-130 relies on visual targeting.

Developed during the Vietnam war as ‘Project Gunship II’, the AC-130 replaced the Douglas AC-47 Spooky, known as ‘Gunship I’, in order to improve mission endurance and to increase munitions capacity. In 1967, JC-130A 54-1626 (“Vulcan Express”) was converted into the Project Gunship II prototype. The modifications were done at Wright-Patterson AFB by the Aeronautical Systems Division.

This model is the JC-130A 54-1626 prototype used to test the gunship concept. You can see that it is still in its original transport livery but the openings for the weapons systems have been made and the test fire control radar dome installed in the left rear paratroop door.


The avionic and electronic modifications of the prototype included an AN/APS-42 navigation radar, a direct view night (Starlight Scope) installed in the forward door, an AN/ADD-4 SLIR forward-looking infrared device ahead of the left wheel well, and a NASARR F-151-A fire control radar. The armament included four 7.62 mm General Electric MXU-470 GAU-2/A minigun modules and four 20 mm (0.787 in) General Electric M61 Vulcan 6-barrel Gatling cannons. The weapons systems were installed on the left side of the aircraft to enable the aircraft to circle a target in a pylon turn without the need to make several passes.

On September 20, 1967, the prototype 54-1625 was flown to Nha Trang Air Base, South Vietnam for a 90-day test program. This gunship was known as ‘Super Spooky.’ The first mission was flown on September 27, 1967 and the first truck-busting mission was flown on November 9, 1967.

Painted in Vietnam-era camouflage with the underside of the fuselage painted black, “Super Spooky” begins testing. The prototype had the early “Roman” nose but after the gunship went into service, it was refitted with the more common “button” nose of the Plain Jane variants and beyond.


This task force became Detachment 2, 14th Air Commando Wing. In June 1968, 14th Air Commando Wing was deployed to Tan Son Nhut AB near Saigon for support against the Tet Offensive. While there, the Wing was assigned to the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing and became the 16th Special Operations Squadron. The gunship received its official designation AC-130A at this time. On October 30, 1968, the 16th SOS “Spectre” was activated at Ubon Royal Thai Air Base (RTAFB), Thailand. While the AC-130 variants had several different names, the squadron and its aircraft were always referred to as “Spectre.”

Here, the “Super Spooky” is en route to night operations in Laos. The rear cargo ramp would stay lowered during combat operations so the crew could keep an eye out for anti-aircraft fire (AA) muzzle flashes and surface-to-air missiles (SAM). Also mounted on the cargo ramp is a steerable 1.5 million candlepower AN/AVQ-8 searchlight containing two Xenon arc lights used to illuminate targets.


The Project Gunship II prototype and “Plain Jane” production models carried the same armament. However, the Plain Jane versions carried upgraded AN/APN-59 navigation radar and an APQ-133 fire control radar. In this image, you can see the positioning of the weapon systems on the left side of the aircraft. The MXU-470 GAU-2/A minigun modules (an M134 GAU-2/A minigun mounted on an ammunition drum) were derived from the configurations used in the AC-47 Project Gunship I aircraft. The M61 Vulcan 6-barrel Gatling cannons were fed ammunition from drums placed next to the weapons. Interestingly, the rear M134 GAU-2/As are mounted above the Vulcans. This placement made for tricky ammunition drum placement!

In total, there were eight AC-130A aircraft converted from C-130A airframes. Here is a list of these aircraft with their serial numbers, names, and fate:

AC-130A Project Gunship II Prototype
54-1626 “Vulcan Express” and “Super Spooky”

AC-130A Plain Jane
53-3129 “First Lady”
54-1625 “Warlord” Shot down Laos (22 April 1970)
54-1627 “Gomer Grinder”
54-1628 “The Exterminator”
54-1629 “The Arbitrator” Crashed (24 May 1969)
54-1630 “Mores de Callis”
56-0490 “Thor” Shot down Laos (21 December 1972)


The Project Gunship II aircraft proved to be a substantial improvement over the original AC-47s. One AC-130A was equipped by the Gunship System Program Office at Wright-Patterson AFB with two 40 mm Bofors cannons in place of the aft pair of 20 mm Vulcans, General Electric ASQ-145 Low Level Light TV 9LLLTV) and a Konrad AVQ-18 laser designator/rangefinder, and a new AYK-9 digital fire control computer. This became the prototype for the AC-130A “Pave Pronto” configuration.

Here is the “Surprise Package” prototype 55-0011 (cunningly named “Surprise Package”) with its new weapons systems. You can see the new 40 mm Bofors L/60 cannons in the rear where the Vulcans used to be. Still flying with the ramp down!


The Pave Pronto variants were nine new AC-130As fitted with the Surprise Package systems. Additional equipment included an AN/ASD-5 Black Crow Direction Finder Set and often carried ALQ-87 ECM pods or SUU-42A/A Ejector pods (starboard for flares, port for chaff) under the wings.

As an interesting side note, PAVE is a USAF program identifier relating to electronic systems. Prior to 1979, PAVE was said to be a code word for the Air Force unit responsible for the project. PAVE was used as an inconsequential prefix identifier for a wide range of programs. However, several backronyms and alternative meanings have been used, such as Precision Avionics Vectoring Equipment or Precision Acquisition Vehicle Entry.

In this image, AC-130A 54-1630 “Azrael: Angel of Death” lays down a barrage of suppressing fire using the M61 Vulcans over Laos at night. You can see the starlight scope in the front door and the AN/ASQ-5 Black Crow ignition detector deployed, looking for the heat signatures of Russian trucks.


The Surprise Package/Pave Pronto variants were very successful in operations in Vietnam. After the war, the AC-130A fleet was transferred to the Air Force Reserve’s 919th Tactical Airlift Group (919 TAG) at Eglin AFB Auxiliary Field #3 (Duke Field), Florida. With the transition to the AC-130A, the 919 TAG was then redesignated as the 919th Special Operations Group (919 SOG). 919 SOG flew the AC-130As until 1995.

In total, there were nine AC-130A aircraft converted from C-130A airframes and two were converted from AC-130A Plain Jane configurations. Here is a list of these aircraft with their serial numbers, names, and fate:

AC-130A Pave Pronto
54-1623 “Ghost Rider”
54-1630 “Azrael: Angle of Death” Converted from Plain Jane
55-0011 “Night Stalker” Converted from Surprise Package
55-0014 “Jaws of Death”
55-0029 “Midnight Express”
55-0040 “Orion the Hunter”
55-0043 Name Unknown
55-0044 “Prometheus” Shot down Laos (29 March 1972)
55-0046 “Proud Warrior”
56-0469 “Grim Reaper”
56-0509 “Raids Kill um Dead” and “Ultimate End”


The old airframes of the original AC-130As had durability issues so a new program evolved using low-time C-130E airframes. Eleven C-130E were converted with the same equipment and same armament as the Pave Pronto, becoming the AC-130E Pave Spectre. The first aircraft, affectionately known as the “Cadillac” gunship, arrived in Ubon on 25 October 1971 and were operational with the 16th SOS their entire operational life.

On 17 February 1972, the first 105 mm cannon arrived for service with Spectre and was installed on gunship 69-6570 “The Hussy” and then moved to gunship 69-6571 “Bad Co” and used until 30 March 1972 when the aircraft was shot down in Laos. After the Vietnam Peace Accord went into on 28 January 1973, Spectre operations in Vietnam ended. The Spectres were re-tasked to Laos and Cambodia. AC-130s flew in Operation Eagle Pull and Operation Frequent Wind during the evacuation of Phnom Penh and Saigon, respectively.

In 1973, some aircraft began arriving at Ubon in a new overall flat black scheme in place of the old gloss black and camouflage scheme. This is AC-130E Pace Spectre 69-6573 “Heavy Metal” in the new flat black camouflage and flew with the 16th SOS. There are SUU-42A/A ejector pods mounted under the wings, with starboard pods for flares and port pods for chaff. “Heavy Metal” served in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, El Salvador, Grenada, Panama, Bosnia, Somalia, and Afghanistan. The aircraft was retired in 2015 and is on display at Davis Monthan AFB (the “Boneyard”) in Tucson, Arizona.

In total, eleven AC-130E Pave Spectres were produced. Here is a list of these aircraft with their serial numbers, names, and fate:

AC-130E Pave Spectre
69-6567 “Ghost Rider” Modified to AC-130H “Ghost Rider”
69-6568 “Night Stalker”
69-6569 “Excalibur”
69-6570 “The Hussy”
69-6571 “The Destroyer” and “Bad Co” Shot down Laos (30 March 1972)
69-6572 “Grave Digger”
69-6573 “Heavy Metal”
69-6574 “Iron Maiden”
69-6575 “Wicked Wanda”
69-6476 “Predator” Modified to AC-130H “Hell Raiser”
69-6577 ‘Death Angel”


Beginning in 1973, all but one AC-130E were re-engined with new Allison T56-A-15 turboprops, equipped with the latest radio and avionics gear, and re-designated AC-130H Pave Spectre II. Following the end of the Vietnam War, the AC-130H became the sole gunship in the regular Air Force and based at Hurlburt Field, Florida. In the late 1970s, the AC-130H fleet were modified for in-flight refuelling and began several non-stop flights from Hurlburt Field to places such as Guam and Egypt. During these flights, crews developed communications-out/lights-out refuelling procedures for later employment by trial and error.

Starting in 1973, all AC-130A and AC-130H were painted overall gunship grey and were sometimes referred to as Grey Ghosts. In this image, AC-130H 69-6575 “Wicked Wanda” takes to the air. The M102 has a red tipped barrel and an updated starlight scope in the forward door. For the model, the starlight scope tilts up and down and swings left to right.


AC-130Hs from both the 4th and 16th Special Operations Squadrons have been deployed in nearly every conflict the United States has been involved in, officially and unofficially, since the end of the Vietnam War. From July 1979, AC-130H crews rotated through Panama in response to Nicaraguan Revolution and conducting battlefield interdiction in the invasion of Grenada in 1983 and then during the invasion of Panama in 1989.

In November AC-130H gunships flew non-stop from Hurlburt Field to Anderson AFB, Guam in response to the hostage situation at the Embassy in Iran and then in Egypt in March 1980 to partake in the ill-fated Operation Eagle Claw rescue attempt in Iran.

The AC-130Hs were equipped with various AA and SAM counter-measures. One of the most spectacular is the firing of flares, where the wing and propeller vortexes swirl the flare contrails, forming the characteristic “smoke angel.” Here, 69-6577 “Death Angel” emerges from a full-flare disposal.


During the Gulf War of 1990-1991, Regular Air Force and Air Force Reserve AC-130s provided close air support and force protection for ground forces and battlefield interdiction. Primary targets were early warning/ground control intercept (EW/GCI) sites along the southern border of Iraq.

In this image, 69-6572 “Grave Digger” fires the 105 mm howitzer during a battlefield interdiction in Kuwait and Iraq. At its standard altitude of 12,000 feet, the gunship had a proven ability to engage moving ground targets.


The War on Terror has involved gunships in the Afghanistan and Iraq theatres. From 2001 to 2014 in Afghanistan, Pave Spectre IIs of the 16th SOS flew on-call close air support and armed reconnaissance missions. In Iraq, the AC-130s flew nightly air support requests (ASRs) and used to gather intelligence using their sophisticated long-range video, infrared and radar sensors.

Taking off on way to their assigned loiter area, gunship 69-6570 “The Hussy” is equipped with two ALQ-87 Electronic Counter Measures (ECM) pods mounted on the starboard pylon. The ECM pods were used to defeat radar and SAM threats over the loiter area.


The Pave Spectre II had a long service life spanning from the Vietnam War to the War on Terror. In total, ten AC-130H Pave Spectre IIs were converted from the AC-130E Pave Spectres. Here is a list of these aircraft with their serial numbers and names:

AC-130H Pave Spectre II
69-6567 “Ghostrider” Shot down Khafji (31 January 1991)
69-6568 “Night Stalker” Retired to Davis Monthan AFB (2014)
69-6569 “Excalibur” Retired to Davis Monthan AFB (2015)
69-6570 “The Hussy” Retired to Davis Monthan AFB (2014)
69-6572 “Grave Digger” Retired and on display at Cannon AFB (2014)
69-6573 “Heavy Metal” Retired to Davis Monthan AFB (2015)
69-6574 “Iron Maiden” Retired to Davis Monthan AFB (2014)
69-6575 “Wicked Wanda” Retired (2015) and on display at Hurlburt Field Heritage Park (2016)
69-6476 “Hell Raiser” Accident and loss of aircraft (14 March 1993)
69-6577 ‘Death Angel” Retired to Davis Monthan AFB (2015)


Fielded as a replacement for the AC-130A, the AC-130U Spooky is the third generation of C-130 gunship program. 13 new C-130H aircraft were modified by Boeing into the AC-130U gunship configuration, adding increased armor protection, high resolution sensors, avionics and EW systems, a sophisticated software controlled fire control system, and an armament suite consisting of side-firing, trainable 25 mm, 40 mm, and 105 mm guns. The strike radar provides the first gunship capability for all weather/night target acquisition and strike.

In this image, aircraft 89-0511 “Predator” from the 4th Special Operations Squadron is part of the 1st Special Operations Wing at Hurlburt Field, Florida, flies over Afghanistan.


The first AC-130U Spooky took flight on December 20, 1990 and after exhaustive testing, was delivered to AFSOC on July 1, 1994. The Spooky was used during Operation Enduring Freedom to support special operations and ground forces. Despite involvement in friendly-fire incidents, the gunship provided a crucial part of the air campaign. As a result, a further four AC-130U gunships were ordered for delivery in 2006.

In this image, 92-0253 “8 Ball” arrives back at base. Note the addition of a starboard fuselage window and the engine’s heat shields.


The fire control system offers Dual Target Attack capability, whereby two targets up to 1km apart can be simultaneously engaged by two different sensors, using two different guns. Navigational devices include the inertial navigation system (INS) and global positioning system (GPS). The aircraft is pressurized, enabling it to fly at higher altitudes, saving fuel and time, and allowing for greater range than the H-variant.

Defensive systems include a countermeasures dispensing system that releases chaff and flares to counter radar infrared-guided anti-aircraft missiles. Also, infrared heat shield mounted underneath the engines disperse and hide engine heat sources from infrared-guided anti-aircraft missiles.

Here, a Spooky 89-0510 “Gunslinger” unloads all guns upon a target in Afghanistan.


There are currently 17 Spooky gunships in service with the 4th SOS. Here is a list of these aircraft with their serial numbers and names:

87-0128 “Big Daddy” FSD Prototype, delivered to Rockwell in October 1988
89-0509 “Total Carnage”
89-0510 “Gunslinger”
89-0511 “Predator” First production U-model
89-0512 “Dead On”
89-0513 “Killer Instinct”
89-0514 “Maximum Carnage”
89-1052 Converted from C-130H
89-1053 Converted from C-130H
89-1054 Converted from C-130H
89-1056 Converted from C-130H
90-0163 “Bad Omen”
90-0164 “Bad Intentions”
90-0165 “Death Before Dawn” or “Thumper”
90-0166 “Hellraiser”
90-0167 “Intimidator”
92-0253 “8 Ball”


In 2007, Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) initiated a program to upgrade the armament of the AC-130s. In 2010, the Air Force added precision strike packages to eight MC-130W Combat Spear special-mission aircraft to give them a gunship-like attack capability. These modified aircraft, now called Dragon Spear, were intended to relieve the high operational demands on AC-130 gunships before the new AC-130Js enter service.

In 2011, the MC-130W Dragon Spear was renamed the AC-130W Stinger II. The precision strike packages consist of a 30 mm gun and several precision-guided munitions mounted on out-board pylons on the wings and Common Launch Tubes (CLTs) mounted on the rear ramp. The Stinger II gunships have been deployed to Afghanistan to replace the ageing AC-130H.

This Stinger II flies with the 16th Special Operations Squadron stationed at Cannon AFB, New Mexico. Note the single 30 mm GAU-23/A Bushmaster and four AGM-114 Hellfire missiles mounted on the port side wing pylon.


Recent upgrades to the AC-130W have eliminated all guns except for the 30 mm GAU-23/A Bushmaster autocannon. The addition of air-to-ground delivery systems supplements the lack of close-range firepower with greater stand-off capability.

The BRU-61 rack on the starboard wing carries four GBU-39/A small diameter bombs (SDB). These glide bombs have extendable wings and uses a GPS-aided inertial navigation system to attack fixed/stationary targets.

The Stinger II can also deploy the GBU-53/B SDB II for striking mobile targets. On the port wing is a cluster of four AGM-114 Hellfire missiles. Developed under the name “Heliborne, Laser, Fire and Forget Missile,” the name “Hellfire” was ultimately adopted. These missiles are used for precision strikes.

The “Gunslinger” Weapons Rack is a ramp-mounted launch device for either the AGM-176 Griffin missile or the BGU-44/B Viper Strike glide bomb. Carrying ten missiles/bombs, this delivery system is intended for low-collateral damage during irregular warfare.

Here is a list of the AC-130W Stinger II with their serial numbers: *
87-9286 Converted from C-130H
87-9288 Converted from C-130H
88-1301 Converted from C-130H
88-1302 Converted from C-130H
88-1303 Converted from C-130H
88-1304 Converted from C-130H
88-1305 Converted from C-130H
89-1056 Converted from C-130H
88-1307 Converted from C-130H
88-1308 Converted from C-130H
90-1058 Converted from C-130H

*This list is incomplete


In 2011, the Air Force launched an initiative to acquire 16 new gunships based on new-built MC-130J Combat Shadow II special operations tankers outfitted with a “precision strike package” to give them an attack capability. In addition to the weapon systems of the Stinger II, the Ghostrider will carry the venerable M102 howitzer. The Air Force determined that shells were more accurate and significantly cheaper than dropping SDBs.

In medium-risk flying testing, Ghostrider 09-5710 inadvertently departed controlled flight and went inverted before recovering control. No one was harmed during the incident but the aircraft was determined to be a total loss, having exceeded its operating g-limits and design load.

In this image, a new Ghostrider takes to the skies. The 30 mm and 105 mm cannons are complimented by the GBU-39s under the starboard wing and the “Gunslinger” weapons pack peeking out from the rear ramp.


The Air Force has ordered 32 new Ghostriders in two planned increments: the Block 10 configuration includes an internal 30 mm gun, small diameter bombs, and laser-guided missiles launched from the rear cargo door; and Block 20 configuration adds a 105 mm cannon, large aircraft counter measures, wing-mounted Hellfire missiles, and radio-frequency counter measures.

The first conversion from the MC-130J was complete in 2015 and the AC-130J entered service in 2017. Here is a list of the AC-130J Ghostrider with their serial numbers: *

09-5710 Converted MC-130J. Rendered unsafe for flight (10 June 2015)
12-5753 Converted MC-130J
13-5772 Converted MC-130J
13-5783 Converted MC-130J
14-5787 Converted MC-130J
14-5789 Converted MC-130J
14-5803 Converted MC-130J
18-5860 (on order)
18-5862 (on order)
18-5865 (on order)
18-5866 (on order)

* The list is incomplete.


The AC-130 has employed several machine guns and cannons over its lifetime. Here is a visual presentation of the official guns specified for the AC-130 since 1967 from left to right:

The 7.62 mm M134 Minigun was fixed to an ammunition and become the MXU-470 GAU-2/A module (GAU is an acronym meaning “Gun, Aircraft Unit”). The Minigun was a scaled-down version of the M61 Vulcan to use 7.62x51 mm NATO ammunition. Capable of firing up to 6,000 rounds per minute, it was limited in use to 4,000.

The 20 mm M61 Vulcan is a Gatling style rotary cannon. This 6-barrel beast fires 6,000 rounds per minute and is hydraulically driven and electrically primed. The M61A1 variant uses a linkless feed system to avoid jamming.

The 25 mm General Dynamics GAU-12/U Equalizer is a five-barrel Gatling-type rotary cannon. The mechanism is derived from the massive GAU-8/A Avenger cannon used in the A-10 Warthog.

The 30 mm GAU-23/A is chain gun based on the ATK Mk44 Bushmaster II and fires between 100-200 rounds per minute. These weapons replaced the M61 and GAU-12/U on the AC-130W Stinger II and AC-130J Ghostrider variants.

The 40 mm Bofors L/60 cannon were used for air-to-ground support. Using 5-round magazines, the cannon could fire up to 120 rounds per minute.

The biggest gun carried by the gunship was the 105 mm M102 howitzer. Surprisingly light at 1.5 tons, this welded aluminum gun could lob a 33-pound projectile over 7 miles.

When designing the guns for the various AC-130s, I wanted to keep them to minifig-scale but with some recognizable details. This proved challenging and in particular, I agonized over making the M61 Vulcan and multi-barrelled cannon like the GAU-12/U Equalizer. The Equalizer was larger than the Vulcan so I wanted to capture the difference in the gunship variants. I wanted to make the Vulcan multi-barreled but couldn’t get it to the proper scale. I compromised and made the Vulcan from a single Lego studded-staff and the Equalizer from four. Neither is completely accurate (try getting six barrels together in five Lego minifig feet!) but at least they are distinct!


As the AC-130 fleet entered the 1990s, it began experimenting with deploying precision-guided munitions. With the AC-130W and the upcoming AC-130J, air-to-ground missiles (AGM) and small diameter bombs (SDB) became part of the gunship’s arsenal as the rotary cannons were retired. Here is a visual presentation of the official munitions specified for the AC-130W and AC-130J variants from left to right:

The “Gunslinger” Weapons Rack is a ramp-mounted launch device for either the AGM-176 Griffin missile or the BGU-44/B Viper Strike glide bomb. Carrying ten missiles/bombs, this delivery system is intended for low-collateral damage during irregular warfare.

The BRU-61/A rack is found on multiple military aircraft for carrying guided bomb units (GBU). Usually fitted to one wing of the AC-130, BRU-61 is fitted with four GBU-39 SDBs or four GBU-53/B SDB IIs.

Originally intended as an anti-armour weapon, the AGM-114 Hellfire is an air-to-surface missile used for precision strikes. The AC-130W usually carries four Hellfire missiles under one wing.


It seems appropriate to end this long Lego history of the AC-130 gunship with the first production AC-130U Spooky 89-0511 “Predator” shown in section. A big thanks to the Spectre Association website for their exhaustive history of the aircraft and squadrons, ais.org and their wonderful gunship summary, C-130.net for its remarkable database of production Hercules and Spectres, and Wikipedia for the information and specifications.



Comments

 I made it 
  March 24, 2018
Quoting Timmy B your AC-130 is very good by the way. good job.
Thanks, Timmy!
  March 24, 2018
your AC-130 is very good by the way. good job.
 I made it 
  March 22, 2018
Quoting Timmy B how many studs long is it. also another idea for you: https://flyawaysimulation.com/images/downloadshots/23966-c-97-update-2zip-116-thumbnail.jpg
The length of the AC-130 is 99 studs. Thanks for the model suggestion. I'll consider adding it to my long list of models I've yet to complete!
 I like it 
  March 21, 2018
 I made it 
  February 5, 2018
Quoting Justin Davies Well done! My brother in law was stationed at Hurlburt Field with the 16th SOS in the early 90's, and I got to tour an AC-130H while there. He also brought me a few shells from an AC-130 fired over Somalia, a couple of 20mm, a 40mm, and a 105mm! I still have them. This would go great with my MH-53J Pave Low III model.
Thanks, Justin! Good story and fond memories of the Spooky. I've always wanted to build the MH-53J. The Pave Low III and Sppoky would look good together. Thanks for the comments and continued support!
  February 5, 2018
Well done! My brother in law was stationed at Hurlburt Field with the 16th SOS in the early 90's, and I got to tour an AC-130H while there. He also brought me a few shells from an AC-130 fired over Somalia, a couple of 20mm, a 40mm, and a 105mm! I still have them. This would go great with my MH-53J Pave Low III model.
 I made it 
  November 5, 2017
Quoting Mark B. Incredible work here. The effort you put into building all of the different models, including their interior details, really shows. The C-130 is easily one of my favorite aircraft, largely because of its versatility, which you have done a great job of showing here.
Thanks, Mark. I appreciate the kind comments. I spent a lot of time trying to get the Spectre correct. In my research, I found a very interesting history that I wanted to share through my models. I'm glad you like it!
 I like it 
  November 4, 2017
Incredible work here. The effort you put into building all of the different models, including their interior details, really shows. The C-130 is easily one of my favorite aircraft, largely because of its versatility, which you have done a great job of showing here.
 I made it 
  October 30, 2017
Quoting [ Kromastus ] Love the shaping and the level of detail here. The guns in particular are brilliant
Thanks, Kromastus! I'm glad you like the design.
 I like it 
  October 30, 2017
Love the shaping and the level of detail here. The guns in particular are brilliant
 I made it 
  September 28, 2017
Quoting Jeremy McCreary Your AC-130J page was a very hard act to follow, but you pulled it off beautifully with this tour de force.
Thanks, Jeremy! The AC-130 had such an interesting history, I knew it had to have its own presentation. The smoke angel background was a lucky find and I knew I had to use it!
 I like it 
  September 28, 2017
Your AC-130J page was a very hard act to follow, but you pulled it off beautifully with this tour de force. The "smoke angel" shot is amazing.
 I made it 
  September 28, 2017
Quoting BATOH rossi as I had hoped, and as you promised, you built the most legendary version of '130 ... great work, as always, and in particular the payload of weapons!
Thanks for the support! It seems your patience has been rewarded! I'm glad to have obliged!
 I like it 
  September 28, 2017
as I had hoped, and as you promised, you built the most legendary version of '130 ... great work, as always, and in particular the payload of weapons!
 I made it 
  September 28, 2017
Quoting Marty Fields Brilliant work again! Well done. This is an excellent guide to all those variants you never knew existed.
Thanks, Marty! I'm glad you like the model and write up. These posts are both entertaining and educational!
 I like it 
  September 28, 2017
Brilliant work again! Well done. This is an excellent guide to all those variants you never knew existed.
 I made it 
  September 28, 2017
Quoting Seaman SPb Excellent work! You have constructed all possible variants of this attack aircraft! It remains to add the options in the style of steampunk and star wars ;)
Thanks, Seaman! The steampunk version would be interesting but an Imperial fleet gunship has tantalizing possibilities!
 I made it 
  September 28, 2017
Quoting Nick Barrett Fascinating, and the model is beautifully done.
Thanks, Nick! I'm glad you like the model.
 I like it 
  September 28, 2017
Excellent work! You have constructed all possible variants of this attack aircraft! It remains to add the options in the style of steampunk and star wars ;)
 I like it 
  September 28, 2017
Fascinating, and the model is beautifully done.
 I made it 
  September 27, 2017
Quoting Clayton Marchetti I just love this variant of the Hercules, the Gunship! Beautiful job with all the info and fantastic build.
Thanks, Clayton! The AC-130 had a rich history and I wanted to give it some attention, which is why this variant wasn't included in my earlier post of the Hercules. I'm glad you like it!
 I like it 
  September 27, 2017
I just love this variant of the Hercules, the Gunship! Beautiful job with all the info and fantastic build.
 I made it 
  September 27, 2017
Quoting Gabor Pauler Whao, this could be one chapter from Kurt's Great Encyclopedy of Lego Warplanes! Very educational, especially with the cutaway models. Better than Jane's.
Thanks, Gabor! It took a while to compile the information. I still have some things to find!
 I like it 
  September 27, 2017
Whao, this could be one chapter from Kurt's Great Encyclopedy of Lego Warplanes! Very educational, especially with the cutaway models. Better than Jane's.
 
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Added September 27, 2017
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