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Liebherr 1750 LR Crawler Crane
Hey Everyone, back with another build. Probably my largest and most difficult to-set-up MOC yet, but also one of my funnest to build. Definitely my most time-consuming. Just setting up this great beast took hours. As I have done with my latest MOCs, I will go ahead and post some of the main photos (meat and potatoes).. and later provide details and photos to explain those details. Be sure to check out the video towards the end as it shows the cranes lifting power.
About this creation
This is a scaled model of the Liebherr 1750 LR crawler crane. Everything is close to the real thing, with some slight changes. Here is a pic for comparison:



Other pics with the extended luffing fly jib:












Here is perhaps my favorite shot:



Video:



The real crane has six winches. Mine only has four. The reasons for the changes are:
Two winches double-up for power on very heavy lifts. Not needed for my creation. Also, as can be seen on the comparison pic, obviously the reeving and all pulleys remain on the heavy boom head even as the luffing fly jib is used for hoisting material on the real crane (often in real life though the heavy boom head is removed when using the luffing fly jib). I would not be using the luffing jib for much, and in fact I only erected the crane for the pictures. Therefore, I decided keeping the lifting head, with pulleys, on the luffing jib and not on the main boom as I felt it was unnecessary (as can be seen in the comparison pic). This meant that the other additional winch on the real crane was not needed (to support both hook blocks). When transforming the crane from heavy lift mode to luffing fly jib mode I simply removed the lifting head from the main boom (pulleys) and transferred them to the luffing fly jib.

Winch number four is on the main boom, just like the real crane. It is manual, not motorized, however. Unless TLG can come up with some bluetooth or other system that does not require wires and has its own power source I would not be making this winch motorized. I decided the unsightly wires and excessive distance between motor and battery pack would be too much. A little time consuming, but the manual winch works just fine. All other winches are motorized. The battery boxes are housed in the counterweights. Each motorized winch is geared 3:1 and powered by a single L PF motor. Manualized winch is gear with a worm-to-24 tooth gear, for an ending gear ratio of 24:1.







I usually am not much of a form kinda guy, but for this crane I made a little exception. I tried to add small details where necessary. I could not help but come up with a nice looking engine. When the engine compartment is open PF lights also light up the area so engineers can see where they are working.







No crane is complete with at least some demonstration of their versatility. There are so many configurations of real cranes. Mine is no exception. In fact, one of the main goals was to try and replicate a very heavy lift. Here are some pics of the crane with only the main boom used in lifting with a heavy lift head on it. The pulleys are real pulleys; slightly modified so that they can turn independent of their neighbors. I have used these before with great success:









As mentioned, one of my goals was to replicate a heavy lift. The first time I saw this photo:



floating around on the internet I was hooked; I knew this is exactly what I wanted to replicate. So I did. The background in the photos are not as pretty as I would have liked, but if you know the 42042 then you know, by comparison, how massive this shot was. Took up a lot of space and it was very difficult to try and come up with an all-white background. The cranes in the photos that are all lifted are, in order, from smallest to largest 9391, 8288, and 42042. These are all the crawler cranes that TLG has produced in the Technic genre to my knowledge. Together, the total weight of the lift was 3267 grams, or 7.2 pounds. My version of 9391 weighed 117 grams, 8288 weighed 722 grams, and my version of 42042 weighed 2428 (with 4 full battery boxes and longer boom). I had to use quite a bit of counterweight for 42042 so that added to the overall weight. And this included a lot of balancing and lifting at odd angles. There was actually more downward force as well, in addition to the 3267 grams, as I had two fishing weights dragged at the sides for stability (if you look closely at the picture of the lift in real life, with real cranes, they also used lines connecting the cranes to minimize movement). I experimented further with the crane at just lifting dead weight, not at odd angles, etc., and it lifted up to ten pounds. I did not dare to go any further. Not an extreme lift, there have been many other cranes built in Lego that have lifted more. However, at least all those that I have seen are out of studded bricks, not studless liftarms. It seems like in the late 2000s the internet was flooded with these types of builds, but have died off in recent years. To my knowledge, my crane lifts the heaviest load in the studless era. Happy to be proven wrong, but I just have not seen others that lift more. The lift head carries six pulleys, same with the hook block. Details can be seen in the videos. This gives the crane a mechanical lifting advantage of 6. Quite amazing what this really means. The L PF motor had no problem lifting the weight, and likely could have lifted much, much more. The other motorized winches were configured with a pulley system that offered a mechanical advantage of 4, and had no difficulty in moving their loads. Truth be told, towards the end of the videos, the batteries were running low, but still made the lifts just fine. I love how Lego can provide such vivid examples of mechanical lessons working in real time.

Here is a video of the lift:



The total weight of the lift was 3267 grams, or 7.2 pounds.













Often times when people want to build large cranes like this they are curious about the slewing ring. The turnables offered by TLG are just too small and weak. Therefore, building my own around a Lego turnable was necessary. There are many examples out there. Pictures of mine are below. I used a L PF motor to drive the ring, geared with a large 24 tooth gear and worm gear (1:24 ratio).





Although I had envisioned this crane well-before the Eurobricks.com TC8 Crane competition I would not have been able to sign up for the competition because it allowed no third-party parts. I knew I would need some massive weight for this beast, so I cut my own counterweights. Although battery boxes or boat weights certainly could have been used the amount of weight needed for this crane in said weights or battery boxes would have cost a small fortune AND made the crane look very unsightly. Therefore, I made my own. If nothing else it gave me a reason to use train track parts that I have had since I was a kid (shown below). The only real good use I have found for them. The metal pieces I cut fit in the grooves of the tracks perfectly (good thing I wear eye pro! There is a little red arrow showing that I would have been in real trouble if I hadn't. BTW.... I ONLY cut in the dark for the picture, the real cutting happened in the day with light. NEVER, EVER cut in the dark for real). The weight of the counter weights used in this build and the video below are:

Two full battery boxes surrounded by bricks and tiles = 374 x2 = 748 grams
Trolley for additional counter weights with tires = 456 grams
Actual metal weights: 2345 grams
Total counterweight of trolley and back of crane = 748 + 456 + 2345 = 3,549 grams

For the actual erecting of the crane, the boom, jib, etc. actually more weight was needed. You can see in the one of the photos not only did I need all the weight above, but additional weights from my fishing gear, and an additional, large metal plate. All in all, the counter weight for erecting the crane (as seen in video above) was 4852 grams.









The axles on the weight trolley can also rotate. Just like the real crane.



I had a ton of fun doing this project. Perhaps too much...lol....



I hope the pics, videos, and information was worth the read. Feel free to rate and comment!



















Comments

  June 28, 2016
lol, I was commenting on how big this thing is. :D
 I made it 
  June 26, 2016
:) are you talking about the picture at night? Not quite sure what you are talking about here....
Quoting Justin Li That's no moon...
 I like it 
  June 26, 2016
That's no moon...
 I like it 
  March 30, 2016
Stupendous work!! It is GIANT!
 I made it 
  March 7, 2016
Wonderful. Glad you like it. Hope the read was fun as well.
Quoting A QIEA QIEA wooooow this is super awesome .. its really great job man
 I like it 
  March 7, 2016
wooooow this is super awesome .. its really great job man
 I made it 
  February 27, 2016
AND 9391 (or at least my version). Phew..... Glad I am forgiven. I was really worried there for a second :-) :-) Joking aside.... thanks for the comment. Yea, definitely needed something non-lego to help out.
Quoting Nick Barrett An incredible build; it's capabilities are astounding - love the pic with it lifting 42042 and the 8288. I was thinking that'd need something un-Lego for the counterweight... you're forgiven :-)
 I like it 
  February 27, 2016
WOOOOOW :-)
 I like it 
  February 27, 2016
An incredible build; it's capabilities are astounding - love the pic with it lifting 42042 and the 8288. I was thinking that'd need something un-Lego for the counterweight... you're forgiven :-)
 I made it 
  February 24, 2016
Quoting Henrik Jensen Truly an amazing creation! This is one beast of a crane, it looks fantastic. I really enjoyed Reading your great write-up. It`s great to dig into how things are made. The quad crane lift is so amazing, Thanks for sharing this awesome post!
I am glad you appreciated the writer-up. It is alot of work but if people read, enjoy it and learn something then out is worth it.
 I like it 
  February 24, 2016
This is an amazing build, really well engineered!!!
 I like it 
  February 23, 2016
Truly an amazing creation! This is one beast of a crane, it looks fantastic. I really enjoyed Reading your great write-up. It`s great to dig into how things are made. The quad crane lift is so amazing, Thanks for sharing this awesome post!
 I like it 
  February 21, 2016
Really great
 I made it 
  February 20, 2016
Yes... I spent a small fortune on 15L liftarms in white and red. But I had fun.... so it was worth it. Thanks for your kind comments....I had lots of fun doing the lift of the other cranes. I actually remember your trebuchet! One of the first MOCs of yours I read all about. Great build. I don't mind using other materials if it enhances a Lego build. I have written my ode to cranes before.... but I think they really are amazing machines.
Quoting Jeremy McCreary Ah, so that's where all the red liftarms went! Absolutely masterful, NFP, including the write-up! Deserving of "MOC of the month" based on your recreation of the lift of multiple cranes alone. Amazing that a single L motor with a 3:1 reduction at the winch could handle that, but your rigging with independent pulleys clearly made the difference. I had to use non-LEGO metal counterweights in my floating-arm trebuchet for exactly the same reason: No LEGO part had sufficient average density (total mass / total volume). Boat weights and battery boxes didn't even come close.
 I made it 
  February 20, 2016
Thanks Geoffery. Yea.... I think doing the lift was icing on the cake. It was a perfect way to finish up the crane.
Quoting Geoffrey Boulton fab build love the recreation of the crane lift top rate
 I like it 
  February 20, 2016
Wow, this is crazy cool! Absolutely stunning. A+
 I like it 
  February 20, 2016
fab build love the recreation of the crane lift top rate
 I like it 
  February 20, 2016
Very nice!
 I like it 
  February 20, 2016
Ah, so that's where all the red liftarms went! Absolutely masterful, NFP, including the write-up! Deserving of "MOC of the month" based on your recreation of the lift of multiple cranes alone. Amazing that a single L motor with a 3:1 reduction at the winch could handle that, but your rigging with independent pulleys clearly made the difference. I had to use non-LEGO metal counterweights in my floating-arm trebuchet for exactly the same reason: No LEGO part had sufficient average density (total mass / total volume). Boat weights and battery boxes didn't even come close.
 I like it 
  February 20, 2016
Whao!
 
By Nirds forprez
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