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Techniques, Tips and Tricks 2
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About this creation
In celebration of the fact that I recently posted my 100th Moc on Mocpages, I decided to make an updated list of all the techniques I've developed. Just a warning, this post is 69 pictures long. But I'm sure noone will mind. :P

***

First off, I would like to link to a few very useful pages.

"Advanced Buidling Techniques" - This post on Eurobricks links to a whole bunch of interesting pages that all teach you great stuff.

"The Unofficial LEGO Advanced Building Techniques Guide" - This demonstrates all the basic advanced techniques one needs to know.

The Lego Techniques Pool on flickr - There is a bunch of interesting stuff you can find there, although those are usually minor techniques.

Technique Exchange Group is a group on Mocpages that I help moderate. It has been pretty inactive recently, but there are a bunch of discussions that you can read through, with tips on everything from Landscaping to brick built figures.

Halhi's Forbidden Castle WIP Guide shows some cool techniques, and has lots of tips on how to approach building a good castle Moc.

The Reverse-Engineering Contest on flickr has lots of great ways to achieve compact designs, and often provides several ways of solving each design.

Also, before getting into my own techniques, here are a few interesting techniques from other people that I find useful.

Well design by Halhi, using a swimming ring.

Round wall/ship hull technique by Halhi, again. I have used this technique several times to make round towers and even round whitewash.

Crossbow design by Object of Legend. I love this design. It's especially great for dwarves. ;)

***

Now, on to my own techniques! Keep in mind that from here on, all the techniques presented are supposed to be techniques that I came up with. If you have seen any of these techniques before, please tell me and I will remove them from this page. But they have to have appeared before the date on which I first used them, which I will provide for each technique.



I'll start off with the smallest technique. This is a little sci-fi thing. It could be a table, or an engine or some sort maybe. I've never used this in a Moc before. First appearance is in my previous Techniques, Tips and Tricks guide.
It's relatively simple to replicate, but I'll still show how to make it just in case it isn't clear from that picture.



These are the parts you'll need.



First, turn the 2x2 round brick upside down. Then, insert the four clips into the brick as shown in the picture.



Then, once you put in all four clips, you top it off with the 2x2 dish. Simple, but the result is cool.



Next one. This is probably the simplest of them all. Also, this may be the smallest studs-out triangle possible. Needless to say, this technique has lots of potential. It first appeared in my first Technique guide, and I later used it in How Benedict Thwarpe got the Hiccups.



All you need is three 1x2 bricks with horizontal clip.



The construction is easy. Just take two of those pieces, and connect the clip of one to the tube in the bottom of the other.



And repeat.



Now, when I first posted this technique, I didn't realize the potential it has. Only when I was messing around with this technique a few days ago did I realize how far I can take it. In addition to a triangle, it can also make a square, a pentagon (more on those later), a hexagon (more on those later as well), and a heptagon.



The square is pretty wobbly, so it's best suited for making parallelograms. I'm sure it's good for something.



The pentagon is also pretty wobbly. You can mess around with it fairly easily, so it's only good for light connections.



The hexagon also wobbles around a bit.



The heptagon is surprisingly snug. It doesn't wobble at all. If you try building it, and yours does wobble, one of your connections might be off by a bit. The heptagon breaks pretty easily if you put too much weight on, but it's great for lighter connections. Also, this might be the smallest possible Lego heptagon, but feel free to prove me wrong.



Next comes my useless pane stacking technique! :D This first appeared in my original Techniques post as well.



As you might be able to tell, there are four formats. Short frames and short panes, Long frames and short panes, short frames and long panes, and long frames with long panes.



First, you stack as many panes next to each other in a frame as you can. For long panes, that's 8, for short panes, that's 9. I don't know why there's a difference.



Then you top it off with the second frame...



And connect it. If you are using long panes, the frames need to be five and a half plates width apart, if you are using short panes, the frames need to be three plates width apart.



All four formats. For small panes and large frames, you need 15 panes, and for large panes and large frames, you need 14 panes. Confusing? Too bad. :P



And just to prove that the technique isn't completely useless, I made a small wall using pane stacking for the windows. It has an interesting effect, but overall causes you more trouble than it's worth.



However, if you photograph through the panes, you can get some pretty haunting images with a kaleidoscope effect.



And some not quite as good pictures with kaleidoscope effect.



I told you there would be more about pentagons. Presenting what is almost definitely the smallest possible Lego pentagon. But I don't know for sure, so please prove me wrong if you can, I would love to see a smaller one.



To build this, start with a 1x2 log brick and a 1x1 round brick. Those are the only two types of bricks you'll need.



Put a second log brick on top of the open stud of the first log brick, like in the picture, and angle it as far as you can.



Put a third log brick onto the free hole on the bottom of the second one and angle it as far as you can.



Then put a fourth log brick on top of a second cylinder like in the picture.



And put the two constructs together to form a closed pentagon.



Technically, two layers is enough, but I like to add a third layer for stability. This technique first appeared in my January UC for the LOM, and has been used by other people since.



Moving on to my first cape technique! This one also first appeared in my original Techniques post, and others have used it since. It is easily possible that somebody else came up with this before I did, so if that's the case, please tell me, and I will remove this technique from my page.



You start by holding a cape sideways. Put a minifigure arm through the top hole of the cape and connect it to a minifig torso.



Then fold the bottom end of the cape back, so that you create a curve above the shoulder of the connected arm, like in the picture.



Connect the other minifig arm through the other hole in the same way, so that there is a curve above both shoulders. Sorry for using a black minifigure and cape, that makes the whole process difficult to see.



Comparing this to a traditionally attached cape, you can see that the modified method makes the cape stick out far backward, which looks strange.



You fan fix that with long hair, armor or something similar. Also, this cape attachment leaves a small hole on the back of the minifig, which can be both a bonus and a detractor. Disclaimer: Be careful with this technique. If you stretch the cape too far, it can rip. That's what happened to me the first time I tried it.



Next is a trenchcoat technique! Again, if you have seen someone use this before, please tell me and I'll remove it from my page. This post is the first appearance of this technique.



Start with the legs of a minifigure. Put the left hole of one cape over the left leg stud.



Then, take a second cape, and put the right cape hole over the right leg stud. The two capes should be overlapping.



Then put an armless minifigure torso on top of the legs...



...And put the two minifigure arms through the cape holes.



Now, there are two issues with this technique. One, it lifts the minifigure off the ground, and two, there is a big gap in the back. The gap can be filled in by a backpack, long hair, a jetpack, or armor. For the height problem, I believe that the technique may work out if you use two short capes. Unfortunately, I only own one short cape, so I haven't been able to try this technique out with short capes. If someone else who does have short capes can try it out and post a picture of the results in the comments, I would be really grateful.



Still, the results look awesome as long as you can't see the legs.



Now comes my straw roof technique! This is one of those techniques that you come up with when you realize that you have way too many of one piece. In this case, I had way too many 1x1 bricks with vertical bar, so I came up with this roof technique. The first appearance was my July UC for the Lands of Mythron.



The roof is made up of loose bars laid on top of a roof frame. For the frame, each level has to be 1 and a half plates higher than the last.



For the bars, it's best to use 4 1x1 bricks with vertical bar and 3 1x1 round plates for every 6 studs of surface you want to cover. Other combinations are possible though. To hold the bars in place, I use 1x1 plates with tooth.



Now comes my oldest technique. Yep, this one is so old that I came up with it before I even joined Mocpages. I never posted that Moc, but it's import date to my computer is 4/27/2013, so it's pretty old. The first appearance on Mocpages is The Mystery of the Black Pillar.



You'll need 7 2x2 round bricks, 1 12 studs long technic rod (ten also works, but the connection is very loose), 8 1x9 tiles, two 4x4 turntable pieces and some various other pieces for the base and the top.



You start by attaching a 2x2 round brick to the bottom of one of the turntable tiles.



Then you give the base some more depth. For a 12 studs long technic rod, the base needs to be 7 plates high including the turntable tile, so if you use this in a moc, you should probably hide some of the base somehow, or use the 10 stud rod, but that will result in a loose connection. Make sure that the hole in the middle of the base goes all the way through.



Then you put in the rod and stack on the rest of the 2x2 round bricks.



Now, take the second turntable tile and attach two 2x2 corner tiles at opposite corners, like in the picture (sorry for the bad visibility, I should have used brighter colors for my examples).



Attach 2 2x4 tiles to 2 stacked 2x2 round plates.



Add one layer of plates all around, and then another layer that only has 2 2x2 corner tiles in opposite corners.



Now you can place the turntable tile on top of that. They should interlock, but not connect. The whole thing should be four plates high.



You you stick that on the technic beam. The top turntable tile is still not technically attached, but it's locked in.



Now you start putting in the tiles. For that, you have to lift the top up a bit. But be careful not to lift it too far, because then all the tiles can fall out.



Finished! The turntable tiles are also available in white and gray, so you can use this technique to build greek temples and the like. Unfortunately, you can't make it any taller than it is, because there's no space between the 2x2 round bricks and the tiles for a layer of plates, which also means that the tiles are kind of loose. But still, it looks cool.



I told you there would be more on hexagons. This is less of a technique, and more of a useful construction. I came up with this for the hexagonal roof in my TTR2 entry, and have since used it in my drum, where I stacked four of these on top of each other to get a 24 sided shape. I suppose that could count as my own round wall technique...



Construction is simple. You just make six of the thingy in the picture...



...connect them in a chain...



...and connect the two ends to make a very sturdy hexagon. This technique is extremely useful for a variety of applications.



And last but not least, my round wall technique.



You'll need 21 2x6 plates, 21 1x6 tiles, 42 tread links and 84 technic pins with stud.



First, you connect all the tread links and put the pins in the holes, like in the picture.



Then you start attaching plates and tiles in an alternating pattern.



Once everything is attached, you can start curving the wall by lifting the plates up and making sure they overlap the tiles. Be careful with this, the plates sometimes pop off, and you have to keep pressure on it, but if you put on too much pressure, the whole thing will break.



You can also put the tiles in front and the plates in back, for which I recommend doing the curving upside down.



And the result, with tiles in front and plates in back. I first came up with this technique for my TTR3 entry for the Tourney 2014.

***

Yup, ten techniques in all. I hope this page was helpful! Remember, if you have seen any of these techniques used by other people before I first used them, tell me and I'll take that technique off of this page. And if someone could try out the trenchcoat technique with short capes and post a picture of the result in the comments, that would be fantastic.

I hope you liked it!



Comments

 I made it 
  September 18, 2015
Quoting Halhi 141 Basically langrjan's solution here: https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/ltdemartinet/18156824693/ but without the Jumper plates (so just putting the end of the clip directly in the bottom of the next clip; the clips have to be the thin U type in order to fit like that).
I see. That looks like a cool technique... Mine is sturdier though. :P
 I like it 
  September 17, 2015
So I didn't read everything I'll admit but there are some really good techniques here. Well done!
  September 15, 2015
Basically langrjan's solution here: https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/ltdemartinet/18156824693/ but without the Jumper plates (so just putting the end of the clip directly in the bottom of the next clip; the clips have to be the thin U type in order to fit like that).
 I like it 
  September 15, 2015
Wow! Lots of cool stuff here. Thanks for sharing!
 I like it 
  September 15, 2015
Nice stuff! It would be hard for me to use some of these techniques as a car builder, but if I do, I'll be sure to give credit.
 I made it 
  September 14, 2015
Quoting Halhi 141 There's a smaller way to make a triangle - just use 3 1x1 clip plates (type 2 - the ones with the thin U clip) and attach them similar to how you did here.
Can you show me a picture? I can't figure out what you mean.
  September 14, 2015
There's a smaller way to make a triangle - just use 3 1x1 clip plates (type 2 - the ones with the thin U clip) and attach them similar to how you did here.
 I made it 
  September 13, 2015
Quoting Gilbert Despathens Also, I have a little bit of commentary on two of the techniques. The palisade-and-cylinder pentagon would probably work just as well with the 1x4 palisade bricks, and, if it does, I think that could result in a very sturdy core for an outer pentagonal structure. By the way, I came up with the same technique once, but for a hexagonal pattern: http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=369322&id=/user_images/100219/13781424623 Finally, the cape technique is also useful if you attach the cape with the hole flaps pointed up rather than folded over - then it works a lot like the trenchcoat, since it hangs to the minifigure's sides, and it might be a bit shorter. I found that up when I made a mistake trying to replicate your technique after your first post, as it happens, and have made good use of it since.
I'll go try out the larger pentagon now. I was aware of your hexagon technique with palisade bricks, but only after I came up with the pentagon. But I thought that what you had built was pentagonal, so for a long time I thought the pentagon wasn't original. :P
 I like it 
  September 13, 2015
Fantastisch, von Dir kann ich noch eine menge lernen. Wirklich sehr interessant. Thanks for that
  September 13, 2015
Oh, and the hexagon frame and the drum were both excellent. I admire your engineering skills for those projects.
  September 13, 2015
Also, I have a little bit of commentary on two of the techniques. The palisade-and-cylinder pentagon would probably work just as well with the 1x4 palisade bricks, and, if it does, I think that could result in a very sturdy core for an outer pentagonal structure. By the way, I came up with the same technique once, but for a hexagonal pattern: http://www.mocpages.com/image_zoom.php?mocid=369322&id=/user_images/100219/13781424623 Finally, the cape technique is also useful if you attach the cape with the hole flaps pointed up rather than folded over - then it works a lot like the trenchcoat, since it hangs to the minifigure's sides, and it might be a bit shorter. I found that up when I made a mistake trying to replicate your technique after your first post, as it happens, and have made good use of it since.
 I like it 
  September 12, 2015
Yay, another edition! Now that I almost have my Lego space re-established here, I might follow with one of my own... although mine might be a bit longer, since a) my definition of "technique" is pretty loose and b) I want to grab any moderately useful innovation I made from my first MOCpages post to my most recent. You get full credit for inspiring this endeavour if I do pull it off, of course.
 I like it 
  September 12, 2015
That's cool. I'm going to have to try some of these, especially the polygons. Nice work!
 I like it 
  September 12, 2015
Nice job! I like these types of Mocs! :D
 I like it 
  September 12, 2015
Awesome! I like the cape technique! Thanks for sharing this!
 I like it 
  September 12, 2015
Nice techniques! I'll definitely be using some of these in the future. Thanks!
 I like it 
  September 12, 2015
... You have the artificer rank, right?
 
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