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Star Trek TMP: Orbital Office Complex Part 1
One of the great new models for Star Trek: The Motion Picture in 1979 was the Orbital Office Complex, which introduced the standardized docking ports. It also featured an array of modular offices, which were clearly meant to be interchangeable. Aside from the lower service module and central core, this meant that over time the station could adapt and grow to meet new demands, and in fact we even see a module under construction.
About this creation
In the film the Office Complex serves as a waystation for the refit Enterprise, which is nearing its launch. Having already been moved to a more exposed drydock (assuming the gargantuan Spacedock was already in existence, despite not appearing until Star Trek III), the Office Complex is a final transport and cargo hub. Itís from here that Kirk and Scotty make their inspection tour of the ship, and also where Commander Sonak and Vice Admiral Lori Ciana are killed in a transporter accident.



At the top are the deuterium tanks, which store fuel for the stationís fusion batteries. This is a distributed power system so there is no main reactor.



The inner tanks are protected from cosmic radiation by additional shielding. Openings in the hull allow for refeuling and structural inspection.



A set of clamps hold the tanks in place, with a Jeffries tube in the middle.



The whole assembly is surmounted by a maintenance pod, topped with a short-range subspace antenna assembly.



The pod is reachable by a Jeffries tube. Although it looks like a strenuous climb, itís actually zero-G so thereís no danger of fallling. The tube also alternates from side to side, preventing injury from building up too much momentum.



Below the tanks is the Modular Tree Hub. Here there are four docking ports, access to the central core, and corridors leading to the office modules.



The upper atrium of the central core provides Jeffries tube access to the tanks above.



The Promenade Toroid is essentially a circular arboretum, providing the only recreation facility aboard the station. It also serves as an aid to air recycling, and can be adapted into a hydroponics bay.





A great place to relax even for stern security personnel.



A lift and stairs provide access to the Promenade at four points.



Bathrooms are located behind each Promenade lift.



The Modular Tree Hub was where I started building. This turned out to be the biggest LDD file I have ever worked on (1.7Mb), but problems were greatly mitigated by designing relatively small modules connected by pins Ė†and then leaving the pins out. With piece conglomerates ranging from 50 to about 3700, I had no problem opening or working on the file even when it exceeded 37,000 pieces in total.



Here are some of the corridor segments. They range from 50 to about 250 pieces. For any kind of load-bearing capacity they would need a trestle-style Technic framework, and I suspect they would still sag a fair bit. Needless to say this is not a Lego model you could practically build.



Office modules were greatly simplified by ignoring the sloped outer walls. The plans I followed provided five sizes of module, but I made do with four. This is the Administration/Coordination Module.



Cozy digs for senior personnel.



Multi-office modules feature the all-important bathroom!



A familiar table graces the Briefing Module.



Docking and Transport Modules can feature one or two docking ports.



A security guard leaves the always busy Communications Module.



Whatever they do here, the Strategic Design module is a hodge-podge of everything else.



The Engineering Workshop Module is inspired by the Genesis Lab in TWOK, but without the second level and with a different isolation shield frame.



Personnel Modules serve as quarters for eight, and also have a mess hall with replicators. In the centre a storage room holds life support equipment, damage control and emergency supplies.



Having a module under construction never made much sense to me. The office modules look like pre-fabricated, plug-and-play components, so why would you construct one on site? It seems like more trouble than itís worth. Unless itís to remind moviegoers of Space Station V in 2001: A Space Odyssey.



Hatches from the Central Core corridor allow technicians to service the docking port systems. Unlike the ports on the office modules, these ones can also service a shuttlecraft and not just a travel pod.



The core provides vertical access: two turboshafts and four flanking Jeffries tubes permit multiple personnel to make their way simultaneously. A circular corridor surrounds the shafts, tubes and frame members. It provides access to the docking ports, promenade, and office modules.



The Central Core connects the Modular Tree Hub and deuterium tanks to the Service Module below. Its five levels are filled with turboshafts and Jeffries tubes, and a ring of thirty-two escape pods.



Normally turboshafts have cars available at every stop, but they are absent here for two reasons: to facilitate evacuation to the escape pods, and because there is not enough room in this section for turboshaft cars to pass each other.



Having all your escape pods in one place doesnít make a whole lot of sense to me, but then I havenít designed a lot of space stations, so what do I know? These are standard single-occupant escape pods, capable of reaching a safe distance. However, they cannot land on a planetary surface and must remain in orbit until rescued.



Once an occupant is secured in an escape pod, the outer hatch is blown away and the lifeboat ejected at high velocity.



I actually began this project long before I started the Constitution Class, but I once again managed to get completely sidetracked. Although I have begun work on the service module with its landing bay, thereís no outer hull yet and it will be some time before I get back to it. So in the meantime, hereís a few teasers.



For my interiors I relied heavily on the deck plans by David Schmidt, which you can read about here: http://www.cygnus-x1.net/links/lcars/sd-class-2-space-station.php



Thanks for stopping at the station!



Comments

 I like it 
  October 20, 2017
Great work! The design and construction of this complex are exceptional. These projects are true labours of love. Congratulations on a wonderful new endeavour; I cannot wait to see the coming parts!
 I made it 
  October 19, 2017
Quoting Marty Fields Always wondered what this was like inside. Amazing work as usual. If I am not mistaken, Carol Marcus' Regula I Research Station was similar, but up-side-down?
Yes, with a few minor modifications, and you will be seeing it as soon as I finish the rest of this one!
 I like it 
  October 19, 2017
Always wondered what this was like inside. Amazing work as usual. If I am not mistaken, Carol Marcus' Regula I Research Station was similar, but up-side-down?
  December 16, 2015
WOOOOOW!!!!! Seeing this for the first time! Amazing as ever! Thank you for this: http://www.cygnus-x1.net/links/lcars/sd-class-2-space-station.php
 I like it 
  September 28, 2015
A monumental piece of work! The amount of research you'd done, and then represented here, is awe-inspiring. I can't wait to see more from you!
 I like it 
  August 13, 2015
Your imagination and building skills are boundless! I especially like the central core, but this entire model impresses. I love the gray rings everywhere! You're a trooper, Misa. Keep building!
 I made it 
  August 7, 2015
Quoting Oliver Becker Hey Misa, that's another fascinating ST build! I specially like the space lock- pics at the end of your post most, you're a remarkable and sympathic enthusiast! :)
Thanks! I love my woik!
 I made it 
  August 7, 2015
Quoting Clayton Marchetti Outstanding! I'm always blown away. Not just by the build itself, but the brilliant amount of research that Goes into it. I always liked that complex and finally I get to see it in all its glory! I can't wait to see the next post!
Thanks, a lot of the 'research' is just what I remember reading over the years, and everything else is from Ex Astris Scientia.
 I made it 
  August 7, 2015
Quoting Gabor Pauler I got lost more seriously in your space station than in JFK airport last time...
They keep adding modules and doing the odd switcheroo, it can get confusing!
 I like it 
  August 6, 2015
I got lost more seriously in your space station than in JFK airport last time...
 I like it 
  August 5, 2015
Outstanding! I'm always blown away. Not just by the build itself, but the brilliant amount of research that Goes into it. I always liked that complex and finally I get to see it in all its glory! I can't wait to see the next post!
 I like it 
  August 5, 2015
Hey Misa, that's another fascinating ST build! I specially like the space lock- pics at the end of your post most, you're a remarkable and sympathic enthusiast! :)
 
By Misa Nikolic
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LEGO models my own creation MOCpages toys shop Star Trek TMP: Orbital Office Complex Part 1Star Trek


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